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Title:
Boetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynte
Translator:
Colvile, George
Author:
Boethius, -524
Formats:
     
Editions:
17
Total Holdings:
192
OCLC Work Id:
3856428773
Record Link:
http://classify.oclc.org/classify2/ClassifyDemo?owi=3856428773
LCC: Class Number Holdings Links
Most Frequent Z2002 151 ClassWeb

FAST Subject Headings

Heading Usage Count FAST ID
Philosophy, Ancient 192 1060860
Subject Headings Chart

VIAF Authority Links

Editions

Displaying 1 to 17 of 17
Title and AuthorLanguageFormatHoldings TagClass Number
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 151050Z2002
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 15050 LC CatalogedB659
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 7  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessaryÌ#x83; for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 2  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessaryÌ#x83; for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 2  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophi. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessary for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 2  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 2  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessaryÌ#x83; for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 2  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophi. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessary for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophi©Œ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessar ̀£ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiae. The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome, : moche necessary for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges ... Translated out of Latin into the Englyshe toungue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessarỹ for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiæ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessaryÌ#x83; for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
TitleBoetius de consolationae [sic] philosophiÃŒ. = The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome : moche necessaryÌ#x83; for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of the lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges. Translated out of latin into the Englyshe tongue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynteby Boethius, -524eng 1  
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